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-rw-r--r--doc/syntax/methods.rdoc32
1 files changed, 2 insertions, 30 deletions
diff --git a/doc/syntax/methods.rdoc b/doc/syntax/methods.rdoc
index b3233e647a0..832ba269b05 100644
--- a/doc/syntax/methods.rdoc
+++ b/doc/syntax/methods.rdoc
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ The standard syntax to define a method:
# ...
end
-add the method to a class. You can define an instance method on a specific
+adds the method to a class. You can define an instance method on a specific
class with the +class+ keyword:
class C
@@ -47,24 +47,6 @@ class with the +class+ keyword:
end
end
-In many languages, the +class+ keyword lets the compiler know that you're
-creating a class. This is true in Ruby, too, the first time you use the
-_class_ keyword: when it sees that you're _opening_ a class for
-the first time, it creates it. When you open a class that already exists, Ruby
-enables to you _extend_ it with new methods. You can even extend core
-classes:
-
- class String
- def hello
- "Hello, world!"
- end
- end
-
- "".hello # returns "Hello, world!"
-
-However, This is somewhat risky due to namespace pollution so this ability is
-best used sparingly.
-
A method may be defined on another object. You may define a "class method" (a
method that is defined on the class, not an instance of the class) like this:
@@ -74,16 +56,6 @@ method that is defined on the class, not an instance of the class) like this:
end
end
-or a more concrete example:
-
- class String
- def self.hello
- "Hello, world!"
- end
- end
-
- String.hello # returns "Hello, world!"
-
However, this is simply a special case of a greater syntactical power in Ruby,
the ability to add methods to any object. Classes are objects, so adding
class methods is simply adding methods to the Class object.
@@ -98,7 +70,7 @@ The syntax for adding a method to an object is as follows:
greeting.broaden # returns "Hello, world!"
-_self_ is a keyword referring to the current object under consideration
++self+ is a keyword referring to the current object under consideration
by the compiler, which might make the use of +self+ in defining a class
method above a little clearer. Indeed, the example of adding a +hello+
method to the class +String+ can be rewritten thus: